Site Home
   


  Cruising Tips
  Cruise Ship Reviews


   European Travel
   American travel
   Caribbean travel


   Golf tips
   Golf Reviews


   Architecture
   Gardening
   Fine Dining
   Home improvement
   Henderson C. C.



 

    Rednecks!
    Dress code
    Arabian Stallion
   Burleson Arabians
   Guide Horses
   Don Burleson Blog

  High powered rifle       Custom Rifles
  Gun Tips



   
 

 

 

 
 

Growing North Carolina Truffles

Independent travel tips for the professional at Leisure

October 2008

 

You don’t have to spend a small fortune to enjoy black truffles anymore; this pungent and precious fungi is now being grown right here in good ole’ North Carolina.

Garland Truffles of Hillsborough, NC offers trees, tips and techniques, and Franklin Garland has been talking about the potential for North Carolina to become one of the finest truffle growing regions of the world.

For our crew to learn about their truffle project, Garland Truffles charged us over $1,000, but he did throw-in a truffle omelet.  Our bottom lines was that while there is a promise of $25k/acre yield, and daily hand-weeding and care for the years preceding the harvest can easily eat-up the profits . . .

The North Carolina Agriculture department authorized a quarter million dollar grant to test the feasibility of growing truffles in North Carolina, and 2009 will be the year that the first harvest occurs.  According to Richard Garland, this sounds way better than growing tobacco:

“The optimal site for a truffle orchard is an open area with good southern exposure. It should be free of trees and roots for preferably a year or more prior to planting but with a minimum of six months.

Up to a 15 degree slope is acceptable. A buffer strip between the edge of the orchard and adjacent trees is necessary to avoid contamination from other tree roots.”

But growing North Carolina Truffles is not a fast crop, and you must wait at least 5 years for the first harvest:

“The first few truffles in an one acre or larger orchard usually appear in the fifth year after planting. On rare occasions orchards have come into full production after four years, but in general it is not until the eighth year that production levels are reached, about 50 to 75 pounds per year.

Food snobs pay big bucks for these black fungus, and Mr. Garland suggests that the revenue can be easily $25k per acre, far better than tobacco:

“Prices have climbed steadily for the last 10 years due to rising demand and limited production. The low has been $350 per pound, with current season commanding over $2000 per pound in some markets.

Certainly $500 per pound is completely realistic, and at a minimum of 50 lbs per acre, this amounts to $25,000 (gross) per year/per acre. We are selling truffles this season for $800 per pound.”

Garland Truffles offers both Filbert and Oak trees infused with truffle’s fungus for as little as $25 each. We love oak trees, so we are going to try a few acres this spring, and hopefully in 5 years we can harvest. They also recommend a truffle pig, but I’m sure that I can train a truffle pony to sniff out these pungent edibles.

North Carolina is the only place outside of Europe to successfully cultivate truffles, and it has the potential to become a multi-billion dollar a year crop. The North Carolina Agriculture department did a truffle grant of a quarter million dollars six years ago, and the truffle farms should be mature next spring. I have notes here on the state of truffles in North Carolina, and while I’m under a strict NDA, this could be the start of something HUGE!

A visit to the secret truffle farm

No joke, if truffle cultivation is shown to be feasible, it could mean billions in revenue to North Carolina, and the farmers are being very secretive, especially since the truffle trees take at least five years to mature. It’s a long term investment with high risk, and high rewards! Planting Carolina Truffles can be tricky.

The optimal site for a truffle orchard is an open area with good southern exposure, free of trees and roots for preferably a year or more prior to planting but with a minimum of six months. Up to a 15 degree slope is acceptable. European truffle farming history has shown that the middle ground between the trees, beneath the drip lines of the canopy, is where the roots meet, the ground is highly acidic and truffles grow aplenty.

 

 
You need a truffle dog/pig to sniff out your treasures

On rare occasions orchards have come into full production after four years, but in general it is not until the eighth year that production levels are reached. But the good news is that production levels are about 50 to 75 pounds per year/ per acre and a mature, well-maintained; 1-acre orchard can produce up to 100 pounds per year for at least 30 years.

 
Left to right: Jennifer Burleson, Talmidge Burgess,
Jimmie Gray, Richard Garland, Ben Kittleson

When evaluating this potential investment, I chose my team for their talents:

  • Jennifer Burleson - A degree in Marketing and a taste for the finer things in life
  • Talmidge Burgess - A working NC farmer who manages thousands of acres
  • Jimmie Gray - A superb culinary master chef
  • Ben Kittleson - A college student, chosen because college students know it all

So here we are, at the moment of truth. If the NC Agricultural grants works out, North Carolina may shift from being the tobacco capital of the world to the truffle capital!

As a North Carolina farmer, I was excited to learn that North Carolina has been proven to be the only place in the America's to successfully cultivate truffles.

 


 

 

 

Note: The opinions expressed on these pages are the sole opinion of Donald K. Burleson and do not reflect the opinions of Burleson Enterprises Inc. or any of its subsidiaries.

Suggestions?  We are always seeking new tips for the professional at leisure, and any suggestions would be most welcome.  If you find an error or have a suggestion for improving our content, we would appreciate your feedback. 

Copyright © 1996 -  2010 by Donald K Burleson. All rights reserved.